HEALTH MINISTRY

Our Health Ministry Team is dedicated to supporting the goal of wholeness in body, mind and spirit that enables us to love and serve others in the Name of Christ.

Some of us are previous or present healthcare workers; others have experience as patients or caregivers in illness, injury and rehabilitation. Together we have access to current information on healthcare issues, facilities and medical advances. We meet regularly to address specific needs and topics of interest to parishioners.

Our health-promoting efforts include:

  • Blood-pressure screenings the first weekend of every month
  • Regular Sunday Health Forums on major health topics by expert speakers
  • Health tips and news in the weekly announcement sheet and on our bulletin board in the Narthex of the church
  • Monthly article in the Tribune
  • Response to specific health questions
  • Personal visits or consultation on request

Click HERE to view a list of our Health Ministry Team Members. E-mail our Faith Community Nurse, Carolyn Wilt, R.N., or call the church office (321-723-5272) for more information.

HEALTH NEWS AND EVENTS

Blood Pressure Screenings are available the first weekend of every month. Our plan is to have one or possibly two health professionals available on the west end of the Narthex (behind the screens) to do the screenings. Sign in when you arrive, and we'll then record your blood pressure and give you an information sheet if you desire. Your time invested is about eight minutes a month to know your numbers. The time schedule will be: Saturdays at 4:30 - 6:30pm, and Sundays from 8:15am - 12:45pm.

Yoga for Health – a weekly class on Mondays from 6:00 to 7:15pm in Lewis Hall. In order to participate, you must be able to move from the floor to standing without assistance. Call Peggy Snead (321-242-9425) with questions. Sign up by calling the church office at 321-723-5272. The suggested donation per class is $5. 

Exercise Class continues on Mondays at 2:00pm in Lewis Hall. IT'S FREE! 

Health Forums: The Health Ministry sponsors regular health forums on a variety of topics. Check  the NEWSLETTERS & ANNOUNCEMENTS for upcoming forum information.

LENDING CLOSET

The Health Ministry has an extensive Lending Closet which includes a variety of medical supplies, such as wheelchairs, walkers, crutches, portable commodes, etc. These supplies are loaned out to parishioners and friends of parishioners as needed. Should you need any supplies, please contact the Parish Nurse, Carolyn Wilt, R.N., or the church office at 321-723-5272.

HELPFUL LINKS

  • HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES: For a lot of information to help you and your loved ones stay healthy, visit the US Department of Health and Human Service's Health Finder website.

JANUARY IS CERVICAL HEALTH AWARENESS MONTH

The American Social Health Association (ASHA) and the National Cervical Cancer Coalition have named January Cervical Health Awareness Month to encourage women across the country to get screened for cervical cancer and receive the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine if they're eligible. Cervical cancer was once one of the most common causes of cancer death for American women. But over the last 30 years, the cervical cancer death rate has gone down by more than 50%. The main reason for this change is the increased use of screening tests. Screening can find precancerous cells growing abnormally called dysplasia that appear as changes in the cervix before cancer develops. It can also find cervical cancer early – when it’s small, has not spread, and is easiest to cure.

Most cervical cancers are caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV).  Early sexual activity is a risk factor contracting HPV.  Multiple sexual and high –risk sexual partners can expose a girl in her teens but the cancer will not be noted until late 20’s. The time for vaccination is before sexual activity begins which means talking to your daughter about her sexual life style at an early age.  

Each year, an estimated 12,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer, and, of those, about one-third will die as a result of the cancer. But cervical cancer is also a highly preventable and treatable cancer, thanks to improved screening and vaccination.

Today, detection tools and inoculations make cervical cancer a condition that is relatively easy to prevent and treat. In women who are not vaccinated and not screened regularly, either due to a lack of information or inadequate health care, cervical cancer can still be a serious, even fatal, illness.

If left undetected, dysplasia can turn into cervical cancer, which can potentially spread to the bladder, intestines, lungs and liver. Moreover, women may not suspect cervical cancer until it has become advanced or metastasizes, a fact which underscores the importance of regular Pap tests. Talk to your health care provider about what screening tests you need and how often you need them.

Symptoms of cervical cancer, which may not show up until the cancer is advanced, include a watery discharge, possible pain in flank area into the buttocks and legs, abnormal vaginal bleeding, unusual discharge, periods that last longer or have a heavier flow than usual,  bleeding after menopause, or none at all.

JANUARY IS NATIONAL BLOOD DONOR MONTH

Did you know that when you donate a pint of blood it can benefit three or more people. Most blood is spun in centrifuges to separate the transfusable components – red cells, platelets, and plasma. Plasma can be further manufactured into components such as cryoprecipitate, which is used in the treatment of hemophilia. Red Cells are stored in refrigerators at 6ºC for up to 42 days. Platelets are stored at room temperature in agitators for up to five days. Plasma and cryo are frozen and stored in freezers for up to one year.